September 18, 2014

Let’s Talk About… Zosia Mamet

I don’t really watch HBO’s “Girls” – I have, but I don’t currently – and yet, I’ve fallen for the quirky, honest, and awkward Shoshanna. Why? Because she (Zosia Mamet) is not afraid to walk against the large Pumpkin Spiced Latte-loving crowd and be different (oh my gosh, different?)!

It’s not just her new platinum-blonde bob that I love, it’s the way she approaches her career. “To me, you should do something you love and are passionate about,” she says. And she’s certainly practiced what she preaches. The twenty-six-year-old Vermont-born actress chose a life of acting over a college education and hasn’t looked back since.

Having grown up with a Pulitzer-prize winning playwright for a father and a well-known actress for a mother, she had quite the childhood. And yet, she never watched American television shows… or hit “real” fame until her mid-twenties.

What does she do when she’s not filming? She plays in a band, she writes a column for Glamour magazine, and now she’s teamed up with Glamour and Bayer Healthcare to start the “Make Your Mark” campaign which inspires women to “make their mark” on the world (side note: applications are due October 1).

And yet, this all-too glamorous, awe-inspiring diva had a rocky childhood, just like the rest of us. In her recent column, she opens up about her eating disorder that has taken years to overcome… and will probably never really go away, not really.

"For years the voice inside me has gotten louder or quieter at times. It may never disappear completely, but hopefully one day it’ll be so quiet, it’ll only be a whisper and I’ll wonder, was that just the wind?"

By sharing her personal story, she hopes to challenge others to make a change. Start talking about the issues, she says, and maybe, just maybe, the media will start changing the way they portray women.

“I recently saw an ad featuring a nearly naked, thin model with the words love yourself written across her. Even this attempt at encouraging women to accept themselves was accompanied by an image telling us the opposite! We have to change the ideal.” And she’s right. We don’t need to change, the ideal needs to change. 

September 17, 2014
"It’s the possibility of having a dream come true that makes life interesting."

— Paulo Coelho (via velvetbluejay)

September 16, 2014
Domestic Violence: Know the Facts
Domestic violence [noun]: violent or aggressive behavior within the home, typically involving the violent abuse of a spouse or partner.
One in four women will experience domestic violence in her lifetime.
Every year, one in three women who is a victim of homicide is murdered by her current or former partner.
Most domestic violence incidents are never reported.
More than 60% of domestic violence incidents happen at home.
Domestic violence is the third leading cause of homelessness among families in the U.S.
Abusers are manipulators and controllers of their victims.
Victims (or the abused) are often anxious, afraid, depressed, ashamed, or confused.
Domestic violence includes physical violence, isolation, and psychological abuse.
Women ages 20 to 24 are at greatest risk of becoming victims of domestic violence.
Domestic Violence Hotline: 800.621.HOPE (4673)
Crime Victims Hotline: 866.689.HELP (4357)

Rape & Sexual Assault Hotline: 212.227.3000

Read more on the ad: http://www.thegloss.com/2014/09/16/beauty/covergirl-response-black-eye-nfl-game-face-photoshop-ad/#ixzz3DVe7XJsC

Domestic Violence: Know the Facts

  • Domestic violence [noun]: violent or aggressive behavior within the home, typically involving the violent abuse of a spouse or partner.
  • One in four women will experience domestic violence in her lifetime.
  • Every year, one in three women who is a victim of homicide is murdered by her current or former partner.
  • Most domestic violence incidents are never reported.
  • More than 60% of domestic violence incidents happen at home.
  • Domestic violence is the third leading cause of homelessness among families in the U.S.
  • Abusers are manipulators and controllers of their victims.
  • Victims (or the abused) are often anxious, afraid, depressed, ashamed, or confused.
  • Domestic violence includes physical violence, isolation, and psychological abuse.
  • Women ages 20 to 24 are at greatest risk of becoming victims of domestic violence.

Domestic Violence Hotline: 800.621.HOPE (4673)

Crime Victims Hotline: 866.689.HELP (4357)

Rape & Sexual Assault Hotline: 212.227.3000

Read more on the ad: http://www.thegloss.com/2014/09/16/beauty/covergirl-response-black-eye-nfl-game-face-photoshop-ad/#ixzz3DVe7XJsC

September 10, 2014
10 Tips On Saving Money & Enjoying Your Twenties

1. Avoid the local coffee shop.

Instead, make it a Friday treat. Every other day, make it at home or drink it at work. If it’s crappy at work, bring in your own almond milk or creamer to add something sweet and tasty to it.

2. You don’t need cable.

Stick to Netflix and Hulu. If you want to watch a football game, go to a bar down the street and socialize.

3. Avoid shopping.

If you need something new, check out Nordstrom Rack, Second Time Around, or H&M. Avoid discounts (unless you need something), because you’re bound to buy a lot more.

4. Make your own food.

It doesn’t have to be gourmet. Rice, beans, pasta, and veggies are cheap. Make one big meal on Sunday and save the leftovers for your weekday lunches. This way, you can splurge on buying one or two dinners during the week or weekend.

5. Don’t drink so much.

I know it’s hard, but the less you drink, the less you spend. And don’t you want to splurge on quality alcohol – like delicious pumpkin beers and fancy wines? Or do what I do and drink Trader Joe’s wine. It’s cheap and delicious.

6. Exercise outside or use free videos.

Gyms are expensive and all my friends use them… but again, they’re expensive. To save money, I work out at home – with YouTube or Hulu videos – and I jog outside once in a while.

7. Don’t take so many cabs.

Unless you need to get home at 2 in the morning, but why are you out at 2am anyway? Go home earlier and you’ll spend less money at the bar and less money on late-night food and hangover cures. Use a bike, your car, the subway, a bus, or walk.

8. Stop going on dinner dates.

Sometimes the guy pays, but it’s not guaranteed. And guys, don’t do dinner dates if you don’t want to pay. Stick to a cheap date like getting drinks, coffee, or going for a walk.  

9. Check out all the free things.

Like outdoor movies, free museums, local parks, author events, etc. They are everywhere! Get in the know and learn more about your city.

10. Figure out what’s important to you.

Decide if you want to spend money on activities like rock climbing, kayaking, skydiving, or dancing. And decide if you’d rather spend money on dinners with friends or a night out at the bar. Do you want to travel more and go out less? Add these expenses to your budget and stick to the budget! 

September 7, 2014
"Love is not affectionate feeling, but a steady wish for the loved person’s ultimate good as far as it can be obtained."

— C.S. Lewis (via thesethmeister)

(Source: observando, via 20--something)

September 5, 2014

Friday Flashback:

 The SYTYCD finale aired this week and Ricky Ubeda, an eighteen-year-old contemporary dancer, was crowned “America’s Favorite Dancer.” He was amazing – his extensions, his perfectly pointed toes, and his ability to turn for hours. He deserved to win and I’m so very happy for him. But it’s funny, every year that SYTYCD continues to run, I roll further and further away from the dance world.

Looking back, I had that timid, youthful glow. I would spin on my knees until bruises formed in clumps over my knee cap. I’d practice my pirouettes over and over again, my head spinning with nausea, because let’s face it, we can’t all turn as well as Ricky. And I spent all my free time in uncomfortable full-body tights and leotards that made it nearly impossible to use the bathroom. For what? For that all-encompassing feeling of being free.

I loved it – the sweat, the pain, the determination. And part of me will always ache for those beautiful pointe shoes which I can never wear again thanks to the arthritis forming in my toes, and that moment when you stand on stage waiting for the lights to warm your body and the music to creep into your veins.

I don’t dance anymore. I can, physically, but it’s not the same. I don’t have that desire to wear tights, to do death jumps, or to compete against other dancers. I’m kind of over it, like getting over my Barbie addiction or throwing away my favorite pants from high school that are outdated and childish.

I will miss it. I will always miss it. But I’ve moved on to another part of my life where dance isn’t the focus anymore. I’ll feel that urge when I’m on the subway listening to a powerful song, I’ll watch dance shows, and I’ll take drop-in classes from time to time, but I don’t want dance back.  

“You have to love dancing to stick to it. It gives you nothing back, no manuscripts to store away, no paintings to show on walls and maybe hang in museums, no poems to be printed and sold, nothing but that signle fleeing moment when you feel alive.” -Merce Cunningham

[This Woman’s Work] - Maxwell

September 5, 2014
The Future Library Project (B&N Book Blog)

What’s the point of this project? I really don’t know… in 2114, 100 never-before-read books from beloved authors will be available for the world (and that generation) to read. Until then, they will be kept in private. But what about the rest of us? Why should we be punished for living in this decade? And what if people in 2114 don’t even care about books anymore? What then? 

September 5, 2014
So Joan Rivers died yesterday…

…and my Facebook feed was quickly littered with RIP and quotes from her days on “Fashion Police.” I’m sorry, social media, but I don’t really care. It’s not that I disliked her, because I didn’t. I was simply indifferent. I thought she was a little abrasive, sure, but that’s all.

She was eighty-one years old. She was old. And yet, her death is “under investigation.” Old people die. But of course, she’s not just an “old person,” she’s a celebrity… a celebrity who believed very strongly in plastic surgery and fashion (neither of which interest me).

When Robin Williams died, I was legitimately sad, because he made an impact on my life. He made me laugh – thank you, Genie. He made me cry – “seize the day, boy.” And he made me ponder life – thank you, Good Will Hunting. And his death was actually heartbreaking.

I don’t know Joan Rivers. She left no mark on me. And therefore, I have nothing to really say about her death other than: sorry, Rivers family, for your loss, but now you can celebrate a lady who lived longer than most people ever will. 

September 4, 2014
"

Artless:

is my heart. A stranger
berry there never was,
tartless.

Gone sour in the sun,
in the sunroom or moonroof,
roofless.

No poetry. Plain. No
fresh, special recipe
to bless.

All I’ve ever made
with these hands
and life, less

substance, more rind.
Mostly rim and trim,
meatless

but making much smoke
in the old smokehouse,
no less.

Fatted from the day,
overripe and even
toxic at eve. Nonetheless,

in the end, if you must
know, if I must bend,
waistless,

to that excruciation.
No marvel, no harvest
left me speechless,

yet I find myself
somehow with heart,
aloneless.

With heart,
fighting fire with fire,
fightless.

That loud hub of us,
meat stub of us, beating us
senseless.

Spectacular in its way,
its way of not seeing,
congealing dayless

but in everydayness.
In that hopeful haunting
(a lesser

way of saying
in darkness) there is
silencelessness

for the pressing question.
Heart, what art you?
War, star, part? Or less:

playing a part, staying apart
from the one who loves,
loveless.

"

Artless, Brenda Shaughnessy

September 3, 2014
20 Things All Twenty-Something Women Need to Stop Doing

1. Complaining about the single life.
2. Taking shots, shot-gunning a beer, and doing a keg stand.
3. Wearing makeup to the gym.
4. Losing your cellphone or dropping it in the toilet.
5. Stalking your ex on social media.
6. Fad diets.
7. Spending all your money on clothes and coffee.
8. Drunk eating.
9. Updating your status every day on Facebook.
10. Wearing white leggings or sweatpants in public.
11. Flaking on friends, family, or coworkers.
12. Making a wedding pinterest board.
13. Crying in public.
14. Dissing feminists.
15. Gchatting at work.
16. Expecting a relationship from Tinder.
17. Going out for lunch every day.
18. Talking shit about other women.
19. Using tanning beds.
20. Taking selfies.